Tranzoo

Established in June 2022

メニュー

About monochrome expressions (01)

690 views

Site Search

Recently Updated


English

Introduction.

Some people may believe that black and white photography is only for a small group of enthusiasts or those who appreciate art.
We live in a colorful world, so why not capture its vibrancy in a photo? Nevertheless, monochrome photography has hidden depths beyond what is readily apparent. Photographers who prefer black and white photography challenge themselves to break free from the colorful world seen in everyday life. They aim to showcase their unique perspective and passion for capturing nature and people’s lives in a different light.

Why choose black and white photography? 
On my blog, I aim to highlight the hidden beauty of black and white photography, emphasizing the meaning of seeing and thinking in simple tones, and the exclusive techniques used in this form of photography. Today, I want to give a quick summary of the first photography in France, England, and the United States at the beginning of the 1800s and what it was like.
Additionally, I’ll cover what early black-and-white photography may have looked like with the different settings of modern digital cameras, as well as describe some of these experimental photos.

The earliest black and white photographs

It should go without saying that monochrome photography is a photographic technique that represents the subject using monochromatic tones. In most cases it is black and white. There are three early styles: daguerreotype, calotype, and tintype. These are very different from today’s film and digital technology. This is a bit technical, but I will briefly explain the characteristics and production methods of these three styles.

Daguerreotype 

Daguerre's studio, photographed with a daguerreotype (1837)
Daguerreotype
Wikipedia ; Daguerre’s studio, photographed with a daguerreotype (1837)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daguerreotype

In 1839, French inventor Louis Daguerre, with the help of Nicephore Niepce, created the successful daguerreotype photographic technique. The method involved shining light on a copper plate coated in silver iodide, fumigating it with mercury vapor, and then fixing it with a salt solution. It resulted in a permanent, unique image that couldn’t be reproduced or copied.

To view the highly reflective daguerreotype image clearly, it requires being tilted. The problem with these fragile pictures was that they were easily scratched or damaged upon contact.

Since no negatives were involved, the daguerreotype produced a straightforward, hand-colored positive image that was then enclosed in a glass-covered frame. During this era, it became trendy to exhibit daguerreotypes on indoor walls.
Similarly, in Western households, entire walls were adorned with paintings in the Baroque style. However, as photography became more widespread, family portraits took the place of these paintings.

Calotype

Daguerre's studio, photographed with a daguerreotype (1837)
Calotype
https://cdn.britannica.com/12/9112-050-C472C008/William-Henry-Fox-Talbot.jpg
Calotype photograph by William Henry Fox Talbot, England.

Calotype is a type of black and white photography invented by an Englishman named William Henry Fox Talbot in 1841. It is said to be the first photographic process to convert from negative to positive. Unlike the daguerreotype, which could not be copied, the calotype process required the creation of a paper negative from which multiple positive prints could be made. The process involved exposing silver iodide coated paper to light and developing it with chemicals to fix the image. Calotype images are generally less detailed and sharp than daguerreotypes, but they are more accessible and reproducible.

Tintype

Tintype
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tintype
Tintype photo of two girls standing in front of painted background

Tintype photography was invented by Hamilton Smith, an American. He created this method in 1856. To produce tintypes, a thin iron sheet coated with chemicals is exposed to light in a camera before being developed with further chemicals. While tintypes had inferior image quality compared to daguerreotypes, they had the advantage of being inexpensive to produce and durable.
The tintype invention enabled photographers to capture images while on the go, including authentic depictions of battles during the Civil War.

About the photo in the header section.

This picture was taken at Negishi Forest Park in Yokohama.
The goal of the day was to try out various methods including ICM (Intentional Camera Movement) and multiple exposures. The subjects were the trees and open space of the stunning 18-hectare park that was constructed on the former site of Negishi Racecourse, Japan’s initial Western-style racetrack. The park features a remarkable stand with three towers, which was finished in 1929. I was especially fascinated by photographic styles from the 19th century.
I wanted to capture the 19th-century photographic style in my own unique way.

I used a Canon EOS 5D Mark II camera, which was released in November 2008, about 15 years ago. Back then, it was a popular choice among amateur photographers due to its 21.1-megapixel full-frame CMOS sensor. Despite owning newer equipment, I still rely on this camera, as it feels like an extension of my body.
On this day, I tried out a Zeiss Distagon T*2/35 ZE lens, which is a fully manual lens, for some photography.

To create the feeling of 19th century black and white photos, all you need to do is limit the amount of light. I used an aperture of f/22 and a fixed shutter speed of 1/5 second. I controlled the light by gradually adjusting the MAX400 variable ND filter to manage the blazing sun rays of the late summer day.
The picture shown here is a combination of three separate shots taken at different times. Finally, I made the particles rougher in Adobe Lightroom Classic to create a Tri-X-400-like effect.

What do you think? Although there are positives and negatives, I believe that photography in its early days managed to capture the passion of certain photographers aspiring to recreate Western paintings by painters like Vatto, Corot, and Millet, albeit to a small extent. Additionally, I find the peculiar use of digital cameras intriguing.

日本語

はじめに

モノクローム写真は、一部のマニアやアート性を重視する人たちの世界、そのように思う人もいるかもしれません。
私達はせっかく色彩豊かな世界に住んでいるのですから、その輝きを写真に収めれば良いはずです。しかし、モノクローム写真には、見た目以上の魅力があります。モノクロームな表現を選ぶ写真家は、日常の色彩に覆われた世界から自己を開放し、自然や人々の営みを異なった角度から見ることに情熱を注ぎ、独自の視点を表現しようと挑戦しているのです。

なぜモノクローム写真なのか? 
モノクローム写真が秘めている魅力、白と黒の階調で見ること、考えることの意味やモノクローム写真ならではの撮影手法などについて、このブログを通して発信して行こうと思います。今日はその手始めとして、19世紀初頭、フランス、英国、アメリカで相次いで発明された初期の写真について、それらがどのようなものだったのか簡潔にまとめてみようと思います。
さらに現代のデジタルカメラの設定を変化させて、初期のモノクロ写真はこんな感じだったのではないだろうか?といった実験的な写真についても触れることにします。ぜひ最後までお付き合いください。

最初期のモノクロ写真

改めて言うまでもないことですが、モノクローム写真とは、単色の階調によって被写体を表示する撮影手法です。多くの場合白黒です。初期のスタイルにはダゲレオタイプ、カロタイプ、ティンタイプの3つがあります。これらは今日のフィルムやデジタル技術とは大きく異なります。少し専門的な内容になりますが、これら3つのスタイルについて特徴や制作方法について簡単にご説明します。

Daguerre's studio, photographed with a daguerreotype (1837)
Daguerreotype
Wikipedia ; Daguerre’s studio, photographed with a daguerreotype (1837)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Daguerreotype

ダゲレオタイプ

1839年、フランス人のルイ・ダゲールがニセフォール・ニエプスと共同で発明したダゲレオタイプは、初めて商業的に成功した写真技術です。そのプロセスは、ヨウ化銀を塗布した銅板にカメラで光を当て、水銀蒸気で燻し、塩溶液で定着させるというもので、コピーや複製ができない永久的な唯一無二の画像を作り出しました。

ダゲレオタイプは反射率が高く、画像を鮮明に見るためには傾ける必要がある。このようなデリケートな画像は、傷や接触によるダメージを受けやすいというのが欠点でした。

ネガを使用しないため、ダゲレオタイプは直接ポジ像となり、手作業で着色された後、ガラスで保護された額縁に入れられます。ダゲレオタイプを室内の壁に飾るのが当時の流行になります。
欧米の家庭では、バロック様式のように絵画を壁全面に飾る習慣がありました。写真の普及とともに、絵画は家族の肖像写真へと変化していきます。

Daguerre's studio, photographed with a daguerreotype (1837)
Calotype
https://cdn.britannica.com/12/9112-050-C472C008/William-Henry-Fox-Talbot.jpg
Calotype photograph by William Henry Fox Talbot, England.

カロタイプ

カロタイプは、1841年にウィリアム・ヘンリー・フォックス・タルボットというイギリス人によって発明されたモノクロ写真の一種です。これがネガからポジへの最初の写真技術だと言われています。コピーができないダゲレオタイプとは異なり、カロタイプのプロセスでは、複数のポジプリントを作成するために使用できる紙のネガを作成する必要がありました。このプロセスでは、ヨウ化銀を塗布した紙を光に当て、薬品で現像して画像を定着させます。カロタイプの画像は一般的にダゲレオタイプよりも細部やシャープさに欠けますが、より身近で再現性の高い写真撮影が可能になったわけです。

Tintype
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tintype
Tintype photo of two girls standing in front of painted background

ティンタイプ

ティンタイプは、1856年にハミルトン・スミスというアメリカ人によって発明された写真の一種です。化学物質を塗布した鉄の薄板をカメラの中で光に当て、さらに化学物質で現像することで像を定着させます。ティンタイプはダゲレオタイプより低画質でしたが、耐久性があり、安価に製造できるという利点がありました。
ティンタイプの発明により、南北戦争時にはリアルな戦闘シーンを記録するなど、写真家は移動しながら撮影できました。

ヘッダーエリアの写真について。

この写真は横浜市の根岸森林公園で撮影しました。
この日の目的は日本初の洋式競馬場であった根岸競馬場の跡地につくられた約18ヘクタールの雄大な公園の樹木や広場、昭和4年に完成した3塔が印象的なスタンド建築などを被写体にして、ICM (The Intentional Camera Movement )や多重露光などの手法を試してみることでした。
さらに、19世紀の写真表現を自分なりに再現してみようとも考えていました。

カメラ本体はCanon EOS 5D Mark II、2008年11月発売の機種。約2110万画素・35mmフルサイズCMOSセンサー搭載、ハイアマチュア向きのモデルでした。この古いEOSは15年間、体の一部のような存在で、新しい機器と並行して現在も活躍してくれています。
この日はZeiss Distagon T*2/35 ZEというフルマニュアルのレンズで試行撮影に臨みました。

さて19世紀モノクローム写真の雰囲気を再現するには単純に光の量を極限まで制御しなくてはなりません。絞りf/22、SS1/5固定です。光量調整は可変NDフィルターMAX400を段階的に調整しながら晩夏日中の強力な光線を制御しました。
上の写真は段階ごとに3枚を合成したものです。最終的にAdobe Lightroom Classicで粒子調整をしてTri-X-400っぽいざらつき感を加味しました。

いかがでしょうか?当初は西洋絵画(ヴァトー、コロー、ミレーなど)をレンズを通して再現しようと挑んだ19世紀の写真家たち。彼らの世界に僅かでも近づき、ごく一部分でも再現できたように思うのですが・・・。
実験というべきか、試行錯誤というべきか。デジタルカメラの変則的な活用もまた、面白いのではないかと思うわけです。

Share / Subscribe
Facebook Likes
Tweets
Hatena Bookmarks
Pinterest
Pocket
Evernote
Feedly
Send to LINE